Protecting Physical Security Systems against Network Attacks

An increasing number of physical security systems (such as cameras, alarms, and access control devices) are being connected to a company's network. With this connectivity, there is a growing potential to compromise these closed environments and gain unauthorized physical access. In this blog post we will examine how protecting physical security systems against network attacks can help prevent breaches. Contact Today: Professional CCTV Camera Company in Dubai

Physical security systems are used in various facilities and industries today. Organizations use them to protect personnel, assets, and information. These systems are designed to detect or prevent unauthorized intrusion or attempts at intrusion into the facility. There are always doubts concerning how secure these systems are in the light of threats of computer networks. 

Physical security systems can be compromised by attacks that leverage the network it is attached to, such as a Wi-Fi access point or a smart IP camera. Like any networked device, systems can fall victim to man-in-the-middle attacks if they have an active network connection. This paper explores why this happens, which devices are affected by this issue, and the risks of these attacks.

What is a Physical Security System?

Physical security system are the building blocks of physical security. They are the electronic devices that are used to protect people, assets and/or facilities from threats such as natural disasters, terrorism, theft or vandalism.

These systems can be as simple as a single standalone device such as a door contact or magnetic lock, or they can be very complex integrated systems that incorporate multiple sub-systems including access control, video surveillance, intrusion detection and fire alarms.

Protecting Physical Security Systems against Network Attacks

Physical security systems are increasingly networked together and connected to the outside world. This raises the risk of security breaches through cyber attacks, malware and unauthorized access.

These systems generally have a low level of IT maturity, which can leave them open to attack. The goal of this article is to highlight the importance of securing physical security systems against cyber threats and how this can be achieved.

Network Attacks on Physical Security Systems

In the past few years, the number of network-connected physical security systems has increased dramatically. This change is a result of a general trend toward using IP networks for all applications.

1. Historically, physical security systems were isolated from the IT network. This isolation was implemented because the IT network was seen as a threat to the physical security system. There were several reasons for this perception:

2. Attacks on the IT network could compromise the confidentiality of data produced by physical security systems. If a system is connected to an IP network and that network is compromised, an attacker can access any information stored on or transmitted by that system.

3. Attacks on the IT network could compromise the integrity of data produced by physical security systems. For example, if an intruder detection system is connected to an IP network and that network is compromised, an attacker may be able to send fake detection signals to cause false positives or false negatives.

4. Attacks on the IT network could compromise the availability of data produced by physical security systems. If a video surveillance system is connected to an IP network and that network is compromised, an attacker may be able to disrupt access to video streams from that system, preventing monitoring or analysis.

5. Security alarm systems now incorporate wireless transmission of information from sensors to a central station. This enables sensor devices to be placed in hard-to-access areas, such as high on a wall or ceiling or inside an item such as a safe or storage container. This has improved the effectiveness of these systems by allowing them to detect intrusions into areas that would otherwise not be covered by security personnel.

6. Video cameras often transmit video footage via wireless networks so that it can be viewed remotely at any location where there is a computer or mobile device connected to the Internet. This enables security personnel to monitor multiple locations simultaneously without having to physically be present at each site.